Roadside Art: Wildlife Crossing … Watch For Tortoise!

first_imgWe have all seen wildlife crossing signs along roadways but they are usually for deer, elk or other larger wildlife. In a desert state park in Nevada, this wildlife crossing sign is for the desert tortoise, which is prevalent in the area and not easily seen by drivers or hikers due to its smaller size. (Photographer Gary Warren travels the country and is sharing his photos of unusual roadside art with the Post.) Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comlast_img

Los Alamos Community Winds: Live Music Drive-In Style

first_imgThe Los Alamos Community Winds. Courtesy/LACWCOMMUNITY WINDS News:The Los Alamos Community Winds is hosting “Bring Back Music – Los Alamos,” a live concert for the community 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24. The concert will be held in the north parking lot of Central Park Square, on the corner of 15th Street and Nectar Street, in Los Alamos. Registration is via Eventbrite at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bring-music-back-los-alamos-registration-124799357237.Bring Back Music – Los Alamos will include performances from The Los Alamos Flute Choir, the Los Alamos Clarinet Quintet, The SaxAtomix, percussionist George Price, and LACW Director Ted Vives playing trombone accompanied by pianist Julian Chen.Bring Back Music – Los Alamos will be performed in a safe, socially distanced environment. Concert attendees will be able to listen to the concert from their vehicles, either live or by tuning into an FM broadcast on their car radios. Restrooms will be available. All other existing New Mexico COVID-19 regulations will be observed.Members of the community also can watch this live-streamed concert on YouTube at https://youtu.be/WTB9PyiF9p0.The Los Alamos Flute Choir is led by Tracey Speyrer. Performers include Heidi Morning,. Nina Epperson, Wendy Keffeler, Carolynn Scherer, Ivanna Austell, and Jo Ann Howell. The Los Alamos Flute Choir will perform selections arranged for a variety of flutes including the rarely used alto and bass flutes.The SaxAtomix is led by Bryan Fearey. Performers include Adolfo Meana and Sadie Barry on alto saxophone, Joyce Guzik on tenor saxophone, and Paul Lewis on baritone saxophone, and Fearey on soprano saxophone. Selections include arrangements of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” and Henry Mancini’s “The Pink Panther.”The Los Alamos Clarinet Quintet is made up of Patricia Cote, Lori Dauelsberg, Tammie Nelson, and Fearey all on Bb clarinet, with Guzik on the bass clarinet. Selections include “Promenade” from Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition and Grainger’s Irish Tune from County Derry.Price will be performing the “5/8 Etude 7/8” snare piece by Morris Goldenberg.Vives and Chen will be performing Alexandre Guilmant’s Morceau Symphonique and Joseph Edouard Barat’s Andante and Allegro.The LACW would like to thank Paul Kunsberg, projectY, and the Los Alamos County for making this event possible.The Los Alamos Community Winds released a new CD of performances created this past summer. The CD is entitled “The Social Distancing Sessions – Summer 2020 (Music Recorded in a Safe Environment)” and contains 53 minutes of newly recorded and previously unreleased tracks.The newly recorded works were all done by having the musicians record their individual parts at home. The separate recordings were then combined electronically into an ensemble whole.The end result is a live studio recording that highlights a variety of music. Selections on the CD include several marches by John Philip Sousa, a suite of music by the Beatles, Ralph Vaughan-Williams’ English Folk Song Suite, and much more. Also included on the CD are several bonus never-before-released tracks from previous live performances. The CD will be available for purchase at the Oct. 24 event and online at http://www.lacw/org afterward.All proceeds from the sale of this CD will go toward hosting the 2022 National Convention of the Association of Concert Bands. LACW is teaming up with the Santa Fe Concert Band and the Albuquerque Concert Band to host this national event locally, which will culminate in a public concert by the world-renowned Canadian Brass Friday, May 6, 2022 at The Lensic in Santa Fe.The Association of Concert Bands is the umbrella organization that governs community bands and ensembles across the United States and abroad.For more information about the Los Alamos Community Winds, Bring Back Music – Los Alamos, and the purchase of the new CD, visit  http://www.lacw.org.last_img read more

BJ Services appoints Latin America area manager

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Siemens Gamesa to deliver D8 wind turbines to French projects

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

The judiciary – still too pale, male and stale?

first_imgThere was a time, in those unreconstructed days before the Judicial Appointments Commission (JAC), when a woman would be turned down for judicial appointment simply because her skirt was deemed too short. Or she looked bookish or spinsterish or headmistressy. Or wore too much make-up. Yes, those were the days, not so long ago, when being pale, male and stale was a positive advantage when trying to get your rump on the bench. That’s a white-skinned man who’s past his best-buy date for those of you who don’t like rhymes. It also helped if you had been to public school and then Oxbridge, spoke posh, played golf, belonged to the right clubs and had the letters QC after your moniker. You needed to be ‘straight’, too, of course, as well as pale, male and stale. After all, it would be entirely inappropriate to have gay men disporting themselves in a judge’s sober ermine and silk. Thankfully, that’s all behind us now and the JAC is busily creating a diverse judiciary that reflects the make up of the country upon which it sits in judgment. Or is it? Some 70% of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) lawyers believe that the judicial selection process still discriminates against them. And the same proportion says they would be likely to apply for a judicial role themselves if there were more existing judges as role models who were openly gay. This all comes from a report prepared by LGBT network the InterLaw Diversity Forum based on a survey of more than 150 practising LGBT lawyers. Some 85-90% of respondents said that the creation of the JAC was a ‘positive development’ towards countering perceived prejudice in the selection process. But there is a still a long way to go, although the JAC is now monitoring the sexual orientation of applicants to ensure that the judiciary reflects and serves the whole of society. InterLaw founder Daniel Winterfeldt, partner at City firm CMS Cameron McKenna, said: ‘It is vital that the judiciary is seen to reflect the society it serves because confidence in the judiciary is so central to the functioning of a fair society.’ The diversity of the judiciary is clearly a hot topic at the moment because no less august a body than the House of Lords is also getting in on the act. Last week saw the first evidence session of a House of Lords constitution committee inquiry into the fairness and effectiveness of the present judicial appointments system. Cheryl Thomas, professor of judicial studies at University College London, told the committee that political leadership was required to achieve diversity. That’s an audacious statement in a country where the independence of the judiciary is the jewel in the crown of our legal system! ‘President Clinton said that he wanted a judiciary that looked like America and that is what began to happen,’ Thomas said. ‘If we want diversity, we need political leadership.’ The argument convinced me. Professor Alan Paterson, director of the University of Strathclyde’s centre for professional legal studies, also supported political involvement, saying that it was not feasible to expect the present JAC to ‘break the log jam’ and make the judiciary genuinely diverse. He said: ‘This is only possible for politicians. ‘The appointments system was transformed in Canada because politicians said they wanted to see women and people from ethnic minorities who can do the job on every shortlist.’ Dr Erika Rackley, Durham University senior lecturer in law, said that there was no tension between merit and diversity if it was accepted that a diverse judiciary did a better job than a non-diverse one.’ The inquiry is expected to continue until the end of the year. So there you have it – progress on all fronts, albeit slow. Let me close with perhaps my favourite – if that’s the right word – anecdote about discrimination against women applying for the judiciary before the JAC came into existence. Praise was heaped upon a male barrister for arguing with ‘passionate conviction’ in court. A woman barrister, in contrast, was criticised for lacking emotional detachment. She was turned down for the judiciary: far too hysterical to become one of us, don’t you know, old boy….last_img read more

Almost famous

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

Building buys a pint … for Sonnemann Toon

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

Electronic disclosure: Paying lawyers to look at porn

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

Petrasco makes urgent flight

first_imgThe equipment comprised of one 20 ft standard container, one 20 ft high cube container and one flushing unit, with a total consignment weight of 20 tonnes.Petrasco explained that the project involved quickly locating an IL-76TD-90VD freighter to complete the transport, while also ensuring that flight permits could be obtained during the reduced working hours of Ramadan.”Our relationships with the carriers and local authorities, combined with our experience in oil and gas project logistics market, meant we were able to provide a rapid and commercially viable solution to our customer within a matter of hours,” said Alan Green, general manager, commercial at Petrasco.Petrasco Energy Logistics is a member of the Worldwide Project Consortium (WWPC).www.petrasco-energy.comwww.wwpc.eu.comlast_img read more

Ombudsman suggests end to ‘no win, no fee’ offers

first_imgThe Legal Ombudsman has penalised firms almost £1m in the space of a year as concerns mount about ‘no win, no fee’ offers.The legal complaints services today reports an increasing number of enquiries relating to conditional fee agreements (CFAs).The ombudsman is now raising the question as to whether the ‘no win, no fee’ descriptor may be used at all.Such funding arrangements have become more prominent since the Jackson reforms came into force. From last April lawyers’ success fees can no longer be recovered from the defendant and must instead be taken from damages awards.In today’s report, the ombudsman says examples of ‘very poor service’ have been reported in the last year. These include lawyers failing to honour agreements with clients or exploiting loopholes in the contract.Financial remedies awarded on CFA cases from November 2012 to November 2013 came to £944,000, which includes compensation, reduced fees and the costs of putting things right with consumers.Chief Ombudsman Adam Sampson said: ‘The ‘no win, no fee’ market has become increasingly aggressive, with many law firms competing for cases and sometimes prioritising sourcing a large number of customers over a careful selection process. 

‘A business model which consistently overvalues the chances of success can drive lawyers into unethical practice in order to avoid financial meltdown. This report raises genuine questions as to whether the “no win, no fee” label should be used at all.’The LeO handled around 600 complaints about CFAs last year – around 8% of the total number of complaints – and said the impact when they go wrong can be heavy for consumers.The ombudsman report highlights a ‘structural weakness’ in the nature of agreements which allows some lawyers to pass the risk of unrecovered costs onto the consumer.Agreements were also found to be complex and unclear in terms of the financial risks to consumers.In one case highlighted by the ombudsman, a client was told to pay £24,000 to a firm that had pulled out of his case after it found he had represented himself in court and won. The firm had dropped his case halfway through, stating it had no chance of winning.Once the client complained to LeO, the service ordered that he did not have to pay a penny of his winnings and the firm was forced to pay compensation for the upset its actions caused.The Advertising Standards Authority has warned against the risks of referring to CFAs as ‘no win, no fee’ as clients can be liable for undisclosed costs such as insurance if they lose their case.Lynsey Taff, director of communications for the ASA, added: ‘We’ve banned ads that have failed to give that kind of information upfront and we advise any advertiser making such a claim to ensure that the commitment is genuinely without cost.’In response to the LeO report, Law Society president Nicholas Fluck pointed out that so-called no win, no fee arrangements were brought in by the government to fill gaps left by the removal of some legal aid provision.‘No win, no fee solicitors are bringing justice to the masses for people denied legal aid,’ he said. ‘Solicitors working on conditional fee agreements take on significant risk with these often complex cases.‘The Law Society is pleased that the ombudsman agrees with us that solicitors need to be very clear with clients on their agreement terms and commends our model agreement.’last_img read more